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Beacons

Stories for Our Not So Distant Future

A riveting and provocative collection of short fiction, Beacons throws down the gauntlet to award-winning writers, challenging them to devise original responses to the climate crisis. From Joanne Harris' cautionary tale of a world where 'outside' has become a thing of the past, to Nick Hayes' graphic depiction of the primeval bond between man and nature, each story thrills the senses as it attempts to make sense of a world warping into something unfamiliar. Original, eclectic, and inventive, Beacons warns and inspires by offering stories that are as various as our possible futures.

All author royalties will go to the Stop Climate Chaos Coalition.

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Ab CHF 14.05

Ending Hunger

The quest to feed the world without destroying it

Is worldwide famine just around the corner? And do I really have to go vegan?

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Ab CHF 25.95

Ending Hunger (eBook)

The quest to feed the world without destroying it

'A provocative vision.' Sunday Times

In 2017, the number of people going hungry in the world increased, for the first time in a decade. Pesticide-resistant bugs lay waste to crops across the globe, from bananas to potatoes. Food production releases billions of tons of carbon into the world, and it's only getting worse. The writing is on the wall: our food system must change. But no one can agree on how.

With his trademark counterintuition, Anthony Warner reveals that we have the ability to make a world where no one starves. And one where we don't feel guilty about tucking in.

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CHF 18.05

Good State (eBook)

On the Principles of Democracy

The foundations upon which our democracies stand are inherently flawed, vulnerable to corrosion from within. What is the remedy?

A. C. Grayling makes the case for a clear, consistent, principled and written constitution, and sets out the reforms necessary ? among them addressing the imbalance of power between government and Parliament, imposing fixed terms for MPs, introducing proportional representation and lowering the voting age to 16 (the age at which you can marry, gamble, join the army and must pay taxes if you work) ? to ensure the intentions of such a constitution could not be subverted or ignored. As democracies around the world show signs of decay, the issue of what makes a good state, one that is democratic in the fullest sense of the word, could not be more important.

To take just one example: by the simplest of measures, neither Britain nor the United States can claim to be truly democratic. The most basic tenet of democracy is that no voice be louder than any other. Yet in our 'first past the post' electoral systems a voter supporting a losing candidate is unrepresented, his or her voice unequal to one supporting a winning candidate, who frequently does not gain a majority of the votes cast. This is just one of a number of problems, all of them showing that democratic reform is a necessity in our contemporary world.

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CHF 17.75

Is Capitalism Broken? (eBook)

'We need to organise politically to defend the weak, empower the many and prepare the ground for reversing the absurdities of capitalism.'

? Yanis Varoufakis

'Capitalism over the past twenty-five years has been an incredible moral good.'

? David Brooks

The Munk debate on capitalism

There is a growing belief that the capitalist system no longer works. Inequality is rampant. The environment is being destroyed for profits. In some western nations, life expectancy is even falling. Political power is wielded by wealthy elites and big business, not the people. But for proponents of capitalism, it is the engine of progress, not just making all of us materially better off, but helping to address everything from women's rights to political freedoms. We seem to stand at a crossroads: do we need to fix the system as a matter of urgency, or would it be better to hold our nerve?

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CHF 11.45

Nazi Germany and the Humanities

In 1933, Jews, and to a lesser extent, political opponents of the Nazis, suffered an unprecedented loss of positions and livelihood at Germany’s universities. Of the 1,700 faculty members who lost their jobs, eighty percent were removed on racial grounds. With few exceptions, the academic elite welcomed and justified the acts of the Nazi regime, uttered no word of protest when their Jewish and liberal colleagues were dismissed, and did not stir when Jewish students were barred admission. Why did the ‘Nazification’ of German universities encounter so little resistance?

The subject of how German scholars responded to the Nazi regime has seen a resurgence of scholarship in recent years. In this collection, Rabinbach and Bialas bring some of the most important and original scholarly contributions together in one cohesive volume, to deliver a surprising conclusion: whatever diverse motives German intellectuals may have had in 1933, the image of Nazism as an alien power imposed on German universities from without was a convenient fiction.

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CHF 136.00
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